Training

sponsored: #RUNNOVATION – Long Run Versus Hard Run

That Was Then Traditional long-distance training was based on a 12- to 16-week schedule that followed a regimen of base building, strength building and speed work, setting athletes up to peak for their races. Integral to this plan was the long run, with athletes working up to one increasingly…

That Was Then

Traditional long-distance training was based on a 12- to 16-week schedule that followed a regimen of base building, strength building and speed work, setting athletes up to peak for their races. Integral to this plan was the long run, with athletes working up to one increasingly longer run each week. A constant debate was whether or not to run the full race distance during training.

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This is Runnovation.

New theories are looking at shorter, harder workouts and muscle confusion to create increased strength and functional fitness.

For their athletes in the Hanson-Brooks Distance Project, brothers Keith and Kevin Hanson don’t recommend running anything longer than a 16-mile run before a marathon. Instead they see all workouts as being equally important and prefer mixing three substantive workouts a week with three easier runs and one rest day.