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Lindsey Hein: Juggling Life and Marathon Training

Training for a marathon is a big commitment. Everyday life is busy too. So, how do you balance the training yet keep a healthy social, work and training balance? That takes almost as much training as the marathon!

You’ll need to experiment to see what works best for you. But the following are some tips I’ve learned through experience.

Have a training schedule/calendar you are committed to but not married to.

If something comes up on an evening that you were planning to run, it’s not a huge deal to move that run around. But only do so if you’re willing to not dwell on when you’ll make it up and promise to have a good time with whatever came up. Nobody wants to hear a party pooper going on about how they should be running right now. Enjoy where you are. You moved that run around for a reason.

Train and fuel properly before, during and after your run.

That way you’ll have the energy to do what needs to be done after a hard workout or long run. A long run itself is already a time suck. You don’t want to then be a slug on the couch the rest of the day. Do it right and you’ll have the energy to invest your time someplace other than the couch.

Don’t be obsessed with what pace you’re “supposed to run.”

It’s easy to get into the habit of thinking you have to run a certain pace all the time. “My easy pace” “My recovery pace” “My tempo Pace” (you get the picture.) While it’s important if you have time goals to hit prescribed paces for key workouts–for the most part, in marathon training, a lot of your miles should be considered “easy miles” and your easy runs can be ran at a range of paces. Great news, because then you can run more with friends and others who aren’t necessarily the same “pace” as you. If you get stuck on staying within a certain pace rather than just enjoying the run, you’re missing the whole point and probably missing lot’s of good running and socializing with friends who might not run “your pace”

Cross Train, if you like to cross train.

Just because you’re training for a marathon doesn’t mean ALL of your workouts have to be runs. If you really enjoy rowing, by all means get your row on. It will bring a healthy balance to all the added running you are doing- not to mention strengthen areas that running doesn’t necessarily hit.