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2015 Running Gear Guide: Men’s Sunglasses

We tested sunglasses for fit, feel, style and performance.

$79, tifosioptics.com

Highlight: Well-priced performance eyewear
Tifosi’s newest performance sunglass is a fantastic debut, especially when considering the price. The lightweight frames feel imperceptible on your face, and the fit is so secure (yet easily adjustable) that it never bounces, even when running on rocky surfaces. Changing lenses was a struggle at first, and the shield style isn’t for everyone. But this is a great option for runners, especially considering the price.

$199, mauijim.com

Highlight: Fashionable, yet lightweight and heavy-duty
Made for round faces, these glasses are lightweight and comfortable, and they stuck in place even when running on gnarly trails. The glasses offer full lens coverage while still being fashionable. Fogging was a minor issue, but the look and feel of these sunglasses put them high on our wish list.

$109, opticnerve.com

Highlight: Nice feel with crossover style
The temples of the new Vahstros curve inward more than most models, creating a nice, comfortable wraparound feel that holds the frames snugly. While not as all-covering as a shield style, these sunglasses feel great, the polarized lenses stay free of fog and sweat, and they’re stylish enough to wear casually.

$324, e-rudy.com

Highlight: High-performance sport sunglasses.
Like Ferraris for your face. The high-quality, lightweight frames feel feathery. The temples and nosepads are truly anti-slip, and the 35-gram frames are extremely comfortable. Fogging, bouncing, or discomfort were all nonexistent. We tested the photochromic clear to laser red lenses, and would prefer something darker for bright sunny days (there are 12 lenses for these frames).

$149-$179, zealoptics.com

Highlight: Optimal coverage.
The Cota Team Edition has optimal coverage without shielding your entire face—a happy medium. Zeal touts this model as scientifically engineered to reduce eye fatigue through strategic airflow. That’s a perk that cyclists may enjoy, but the impact was minimal in our running tests. That said, this is still a solid choice for runners: It’s lightweight, the polarized lenses were effective, and the look is sharp.

$129, julbo.com

Highlight: Photochromic lenses with just the right tint.
The Venturi’s photochromic lenses are great for trail running on both cloudy and bright days, assuring that the glasses tint enough to block the sun, but not too much to hinder your vision. In addition, the large lenses covered even peripheral vision, and the frame’s fit was good to both the face and head.

$129, nativeeyewear.com

Highlight: Optimal coverage.
The latest version of the popular Hardtop series is made with trail runners in mind. The Ultras have a sharp look that we liked, and while one tester with a self-described large face struggled with the fit, they can perform well for the right runner. One definite plus: switching out lenses was easier on these than any other frames we tested.